Converting Boucher’s Jeune fille allongée

More Post-modern Rococo: converting Boucher into a lino print.

Copy after Boucher's Jeune fille allongée, ink on lino
Copy after Boucher’s Jeune fille allongée, ink on lino

In copying Boucher’s image Jeune fille allongée (1752) in order to make a lino print of it, I noticed how startlingly geometrical it is. You can see my pencil mark for the vertical centre, and I have also put small triangles at each side edge indicating quarter, third, half and two-thirds horizontally. The top of the wooden panelling is almost exactly a quarter of the way down from the top, the molding of the same panel is at a third of the way down and her eye is somewhere in between. The top edge of the mattress is a third of the way up and the bottom of the mattress is a quarter of the way up from the bottom. Her left buttock is dead centre. Her eye is also almost exactly a sixth of the way from the left edge.

Boucher's Jeune fille alongée (1752)
Boucher’s original painting of the Blonde odalisque, otherwise known as Jeune fille alongée (1752)

Other geometrical constructions could be made with a diagonal from top centre to bottom left corner more-or-less coinciding with her left arm and a diagonal from upper left to bottom right corners aligned with her left thigh. Beyond that one could probably find phi, correspondences to the dimensions of the Great Pyramid and by correlation with Nostradamus predict the major events of the rest of the 21st century, but I leave that to wits superior to mine.

Lino print to follow, if all goes well.

Girl reading – after Fragonard

fragonard_girlCopy after Fragonard.

I sometimes copy old master paintings. This is partly because I like them and partly because I want to learn how they did them. Of course I read up on the theory (Eric Hebborn’s The Art Forger’s Handbook is a good place to start, and looking at unfinished work and artist’s sketches in museums is another). But actually doing it reveals what one does and does not know.